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Full Steam Ahead – #2/6 – How railway companies began to develop ways of moving people, rather than just stone, coal and iron, around the country

20/06/2019

BBC 2

Historians Ruth Goodman, Alex Langlands and Peter Ginn visit Beamish in County Durham to examine how railway companies began to develop ways of moving people, rather than just stone, coal and iron, around the country.

The comfort of the early passenger wagons are put to the test on one of the earliest steam trains, and Ruth finds out how people were moving further than ever before.

Peter and Alex are put through their paces discovering what life was like for the railway navvies, the people that built thousands of miles of iron roads across the country and in all weather conditions. They come face to face with the harsh realities faced by countless workmen. A demand for building railways transcended across other industries, even reviving many.

Ruth finds out what impact they had on cottage industries and looks at the role that horsehair played in making the carriages as people-friendly as possible. With the railways opening up plenty of new job roles,

Ruth finds out what the role of the guard would have entailed at the Bluebell Line.

The team take a flying visit to a refreshment room, using the Railway Travellers Handy Book to guide them through the necessary etiquette.

The team also discover the downside of compartment-only carriages, come face to face with a cardsharp and find out what precautions you could take should you go on a long train journey that was yet to include the necessary facilities!

2 Comments leave one →
  1. 20/07/2019 12:32

    A lot of research obviously, went into your posts!

    Like

  2. 20/07/2019 12:32

    Reblogged this on By the Mighty Mumford and commented:
    JUST LOVE THIS NEW TO ME BLOG!!!

    Like

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